(too old to reply)
poetry set to music
mariav
2004-02-13 19:32:20 UTC
Post by don freeman
Leonard Cohen's Suzanne was originally a poem
Donovan put Shakespear's Under the Greenwood Tree to music
Phil Ochs, aside from the Highwayman, did The Bells by Poe
Bob Marley's War was a poetic speech set to music
Yes,Leonard Cohen has had books of poetry books published,a
novel("Beautiful Losers"),like Richard Farina,who released LPs(with
wife Mimi, and "Been Down----",a novelHadju writes of the Dylan-Farina
association in "Positively Fourth Street").All hold well after the
years.Ginsberg put Blake to music,eccentric,even for me(I sent for a
disc "London",and "The Lamb" by Blake(Out of Print,under the name "The
Crackers"),read at a coffeehouse,sold 30 copies of a disc reading
playing Blakesongs,one by Dylan-"Tommorow is a Long Time",put new
music to"God moves in mysterious ways"),Van Morrison recorded the
great one,Yeats,""Your original Face"pn "Too Long in Exile",on "A
Sense of Wonder" recited with a la Spector sound two passages-"The
Price of Experience"&"The Slave Grinding at the Mill"-great,remember
Sebastian Cabot did a recitation? to music(a novelty for him or
us.Who's next,Ray Stevens?).Judy Collins did a few things(I don't like
her,she'll live),a band whose name I can't recall did a
vicious,ominous Blake song,"The Tyger",McClure played something with
his poetry ,didn't he(Bob Dylan told him that was the way,put the
poems to music,Bob's done ok.mv
Mcnois
2004-02-13 19:40:02 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
On "Fragments of a Rainy Season," John Cale adapts three Dylan Thomas
poems to music:

"On A Wedding Anniversary"
"Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed"
"Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"
Fat Nancy
2004-02-13 19:41:21 UTC
Greg Brown's album "Songs of Innocence and Experience" is wonderful.
As you may have guessed, the songs are Blake's poems set to music.
Peter J Ross
2004-02-13 23:50:52 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
<spamlinks snipped>

Google the word "hubris", Dorkery.
--
PJR :-)

(Remove NOSPAM to reply)
Martin killeen
2004-02-14 03:30:14 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
The Innocence Mission adapt their 'No Storms Come' from the poem
'Heaven-Haven' by Gerard Manley Hopkins: a beautiful performance from
Karen Peris accompanied only by the piano of husband Don.

Martin
Colin Ward
2004-02-14 04:16:30 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
If you have not heard Lord Alfred Tennyson's
"Our Lady of Shallott" on Loreena McKennitt's
"The Visit" CD you just haven't lived. And that
isn't even the best song on the album.

http://www.shop-fast-easy-music.com/cds-item_id-B000002LT2-search_type-AsinSearch-locale-us.html
PrivateCitizen_dudley
2004-02-14 07:54:15 UTC
Post by Séimí mac Liam
The Fugs did Blake's Ah Sunflower,
on the same album was the Swinbourne Stomp and "What a piece of work is
Man".
Good on ya.

Fugs (Sanders) also recorded Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach". I thnik
originally "Tenderness Junction"; later 1990's "No More Slavery"???

}
Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.
{
Séimí mac Liam
2004-02-14 15:55:54 UTC
Post by PrivateCitizen_dudley
Post by Séimí mac Liam
The Fugs did Blake's Ah Sunflower,
on the same album was the Swinbourne Stomp and "What a piece of work
is Man".
Good on ya.
Fugs (Sanders) also recorded Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach". I thnik
originally "Tenderness Junction"; later 1990's "No More Slavery"???
}
Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.
{
To paraphrase a Phil Ochs album cover, 2 Fugs fans can't be wrong.
--
Saint Séimí mac Liam
Carriagemaker to the court of Queen Maeve
Prophet of The Great Tagger
Canonized December '99
Tim Baxter
2004-02-16 03:44:08 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Tom Waits set a famous recording of Allen Ginsberg's 'America' to music.
It's really nothing more background music though. It's still Ginsberg
reading it.

Tim
Féachadóir
2004-02-15 13:23:29 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Much old Irish poetry was in the form of song to begin with. Eibhlín a
Rún for instance has always been known to me as a song, and only
recently did I learn it had been "upgraded" to a poem.

The distinction between song and poem is artificial. There are modern
songs that stand as poetry. Most of Bruce Springsteen for instance.
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".


Eibhlín a Rún
Cearbhaill Ó Dalaigh

Le grá dhuit níl radharc am cheann,
Eibhlín a Riún,
Is trácht ort is saidhbhreas liom,
Eibhlín a Riún;
Ó mo mhórdháil ró-ghreidhnmhear thú,
sólás na Soillse's tú,
Ó mo lile thú, mo mheidhir is tú,
mo bhruinneal thú go deimhin.
A's mo chlús dá bhfuil sa choill seo's tú.
As mo chroí 'stigh níl leigheas gan tú,
Eibhlín a Riún.

Le cúirtéis na tlúig bhéit, is tú,
Eibhlín a Riún,
Dúrt bréag nú's liam fhéinig tú,
Eibhlín a Riún,
Mar is breátha ná Bhénus tú,
'sis áilne ná'n Réilthean tú;
Ó mo Hélen tú gan bhéim is tú mo rós,
mo lil mo chraobh
Mo stór d'á bhfuil sa tsaol so's tú,
Agus rún mo chroí agus mo chléibh is tú,
Eibhlín a Riún.

Do shiúlfainn féin i gcónáí leat,
Eibhlín a Rún :|
Do shiúlfainn féin i gcónáí leat,
síos go Tír Amhlghaidh leat,
Mar shúil go mbéinn i gcleamhnas,
Eibhlín a Rún.

An dtiocfaidh no'n bhanfaidh tó,
Eibhlín a Rún :|
Tiocfaidh mé, 'sní fhanfaidh mé,
Tiocfaidh mé,' sní fhanfaidh mé
Tiocfaidh mé, 'sní fhanfaidh mé
'S éalóidh mé stór.

Sheolfainn féin gamhna leat,
Eibhlín a Rún :|
Sheolfainn féin gamhna leat,
síos go Tír Amhlghaidh leat
Mar shúil go mbeinn i gcleamhnas leat,
Eibhlín a Rún.

An dtiocfaidh tú nó an bhfanfaidh tú,
Eibhlín a Rún? :|
Tiocfaidh mé is ní fhanfaidh mé,
tiocfaidh mé is ni fhanfaidh mé
Tiocfaidh mé is ní fhanfaidh mé
is ealóidh mé le me stór.
--
"Ferr fíor fertaib"
Féachadóir
don freeman
2004-02-15 18:07:03 UTC
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
mariav
2004-02-15 21:52:19 UTC
Some poets want some restrriction as to what is done with their work.I
met Philip Glass and we talked briefly,me asking ,that,if you're
putting music to words,how did he choose Ginsberg who is not in my
opinion one of the "great" American poets over
Stafford,Olds,Plath,Bly,Dickey...he mumbled something,to the effect,if
I understood him,that he wanted someone who was beter known,no
quarrel,it takes do re me.On this subject,musicians should honor a
poet's expressed intention in a will,W.B. Yeats,preferring only
classical music for a setting(he died before hip-hop).Van Morrison put
Blake out on "A Sense Of Wonder" with "The Price of
Experience".Kristofferson had on the back of an LP a section of "The
Marriage of Heaven and Hell." You know Carl Sandburg sang many of his
poems,the first hearing reminded me of a mature,wise man like Bob
Dylan. mv at the old folks home,no,it's college
BlackMonk
2004-02-16 00:04:25 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
First that comes to mind is Syd Barrett's recording of James Joyce's "Golden
Hair."
Féachadóir
2004-02-16 10:55:21 UTC
Post by don freeman
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she
He...
Post by don freeman
pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
He left it to the class to discuss. The students picked the song and
its possible meanings apart for themselves.
--
"Ferr fíor fertaib"
Féachadóir
mariav
2004-02-16 20:26:43 UTC
Post by Tim Baxter
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Tom Waits set a famous recording of Allen Ginsberg's 'America' to music.
It's really nothing more background music though. It's still Ginsberg
reading it.
Tim
A group in this fertile-oh,my goodness-region recorded "The
Tyger"(Blake)and "Crazy Jane on God"(Yeats)on a 1988 recordimg,".The
Crackers.I am not certain they exist ,since they do put a group
picture on the cover(they could be old,they sound old).In fact they
may be an invention of T Bone Burnett.The Yeats is better than
Morrison's Yeats on "Too Long in Exile"("Your Original Face").mv
mariav
2004-02-16 20:33:13 UTC
Post by BlackMonk
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
First that comes to mind is Syd Barrett's recording of James Joyce's "Golden
Hair."
I'll plead guilty to not reading every line of evry entry,but has
anyone mentioned Eliot's "Cats".mv
westprog
2004-02-16 20:35:24 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Billy Bragg - A Pict Song, Kipling.


C/

SOTW: "Mr Psycho" - Space

"So, you don't care about the Irish in the 6 counties ?"

"It is because I care so much about them that I get very annoyed when wannabee
plastic paddies who live 3000 miles away pay good money to have some of
them shot
when they answer the door at night." - Des
Dennis M. Hammes
2004-02-17 13:05:43 UTC
Post by don freeman
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
Perhaps she didn't know that Eleanor was the wife for whom Rigby
designed the .416 Rigby cartridge, so that a woman could take
"thick-skinned, dangerous" game in Africa legally (min. .40 bore)
and without getting knocked over the horizon from the recoil. Usual
at the time were the .577 or .600 Nitro Express in the Rigby or
other double rifle, recoil from which is more energy than a .38
Special delivers with the bullet.
(The .416 Rigby was reintroduced by Remington in the 700 long
magnum action a couple decades ago.)
--
-------(m+
~/:o)_|
The sucking noises made by Babies is not law,
no matter how many of them *agree* that it is.
http://scrawlmark.org
Dennis M. Hammes
2004-02-17 13:06:48 UTC
Post by mariav
Post by BlackMonk
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
First that comes to mind is Syd Barrett's recording of James Joyce's "Golden
Hair."
I'll plead guilty to not reading every line of evry entry,but has
anyone mentioned Eliot's "Cats".mv
No. Heh. Possibly we were trying to forget it.
--
-------(m+
~/:o)_|
The sucking noises made by Babies is not law,
no matter how many of them *agree* that it is.
http://scrawlmark.org
Will Dockery
2004-02-17 18:14:43 UTC
Post by Dennis M. Hammes
Post by don freeman
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
Perhaps she didn't know that Eleanor was the wife for whom Rigby
designed the .416 Rigby cartridge, so that a woman could take
"thick-skinned, dangerous" game in Africa legally (min. .40 bore)
and without getting knocked over the horizon from the recoil. Usual
at the time were the .577 or .600 Nitro Express in the Rigby or
other double rifle, recoil from which is more energy than a .38
Special delivers with the bullet.
(The .416 Rigby was reintroduced by Remington in the 700 long
magnum action a couple decades ago.)
A couple decades--- "Eleanor Rigby" is closer to four decades.
Will

http://music.lulu.com/content/29085
Post by Dennis M. Hammes
-------(m+
~/:o)_|
The sucking noises made by Babies is not law,
no matter how many of them *agree* that it is.
http://scrawlmark.org
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