Discussion:
poetry set to music
(too old to reply)
Ouverture
2004-02-12 17:08:48 UTC
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.

Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?

Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Gummo
2004-02-12 19:48:50 UTC
Jan

I have a particular favourite: The Waterboys exquisite musical version of
Yeats' The Stolen Child.

Gummo
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Paul Heslop
2004-02-13 00:26:20 UTC
Post by Gummo
Jan
I have a particular favourite: The Waterboys exquisite musical version of
Yeats' The Stolen Child.
Gummo
Seconded, I was just going to suggest it :O)


--
Paul.
--------------------------------------------------------------
to look at
http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
Rhyme Runner
2004-02-13 00:38:45 UTC
Post by Paul Heslop
Post by Gummo
Jan
I have a particular favourite: The Waterboys exquisite musical version of
Yeats' The Stolen Child.
Gummo
Seconded, I was just going to suggest it :O)
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild

..what kind of music?

..link?




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Alan Smaill
2004-02-13 00:37:55 UTC
Post by Rhyme Runner
Post by Paul Heslop
Post by Gummo
Jan
I have a particular favourite: The Waterboys exquisite musical version of
Yeats' The Stolen Child.
Gummo
Seconded, I was just going to suggest it :O)
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
..what kind of music?
..link?
www.yeatssociety.org/ydiscog.html
--
Alan Smaill
School of Informatics tel: 44-131-650-2710
University of Edinburgh
Rhyme for change?
2004-02-13 03:04:36 UTC
Post by Alan Smaill
Post by Rhyme Runner
Post by Paul Heslop
Post by Gummo
Jan
I have a particular favourite: The Waterboys exquisite musical version of
Yeats' The Stolen Child.
Gummo
Seconded, I was just going to suggest it :O)
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
..what kind of music?
..link?
www.yeatssociety.org/ydiscog.html
The link for Stolen Child was dead.

Actually, I meant an online link, not to buy.
Post by Alan Smaill
--
Alan Smaill
School of Informatics tel: 44-131-650-2710
University of Edinburgh
Michael Cook
2004-02-13 02:40:46 UTC
"Rhyme Runner" <***@TheRevenge.Com> wrote in message news:402c1aff$***@127.0.0.1...
"Nothing said on a poetry group should get anyone upset.
...unless you are all truly the moronic babies of my parody."

Tom Bishop trying to explain.


http://www.net-kooks.no-ip.info
Paul Heslop
2004-02-13 02:56:50 UTC
Post by Rhyme Runner
Post by Paul Heslop
Post by Gummo
Jan
I have a particular favourite: The Waterboys exquisite musical version of
Yeats' The Stolen Child.
Gummo
Seconded, I was just going to suggest it :O)
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
..what kind of music?
Nice jangly stuff... fits very well



--
Paul.
--------------------------------------------------------------
to look at
http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
Bóliath
2004-02-12 19:50:18 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
The Waterboys & Niall Tobin - Yeats poem The Stolen Child
Féachadóir
2004-02-13 00:34:37 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Luke Kelly & the Dubliners, Raglan Road, Patrick Kavanagh
--
"Ferr fíor fertaib"
Féachadóir
Bóliath
2004-02-13 15:18:31 UTC
Post by Féachadóir
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Luke Kelly & the Dubliners, Raglan Road, Patrick Kavanagh
nice one!

Liam Neeson did something recently too - I can't remember with who or
what poem - anyone?
Gummo
2004-02-13 01:00:31 UTC
Another Yeats: Down By The Sally Gardens recorded by various artists.

Gummo
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
MMcC
2004-02-13 03:03:46 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Yeats' poems have been an especially popular target in this regard.
Mike Scott/Waterboys have recorded his "Stolen Child" and "Love and
Death".
"Song of the Wandering Aengus" has been recorded by quite a few
people, Christy Moore does an especially poignant version.
"The Lake Isle of Innisfree" has been recorded by a few people too.
There's other examples of Yeats stuff that won't come to mind at the
moment.

Paddy Kavanagh's "Raglan Rd" has also been recorded by oodles of
people.

Sean Tyrell has a special penchant for putting poems to music. He has
recorded poems by John Boyle O'Reilly (his adaption of "Cry of a
Dreamer" is a particular favourite of mine), Michael Hartnett's "The
Ghost Of Billy Mulvihill", as well as poems by Yeats and some others
who I can't seem to remember right now.
He is also noted for putting Brian Merriman's epic 1,000 line poem,
"Cúirt an Mhean Oíche", to music in a production with the Druid
Theatre company... I'd love to have seen that.

"The Tinkerman's Daughter", which has been recorded by lots of trad
singers, is Mickey McConnell's more abbreviated song version of Kerry
poet, Sigerson Clifford's "The Ballad of the Tinker's Daughter".
Niamh Parson's does the finest recorded version of that I've ever
heard. (Though I have a recording on minidisc I made of her signing an
unaccompianed version in the back room of Moloney's Pub in Feakle that
would make the hair stand up on your neck.)

Speaking of Sigerson Clifford, his "Boys of Barr na Sráide" is of
course one very well known song that everyone sings, but I think he
wrote that as a song and not a poem.

I saw Gerry O'Beirne do a gorgeous, fairly contemporary, version of
Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill's "Leaba Shíoda" live one time... just imagine
that beautiful poem with his soft voice and exquisite guitar playing
and you'll have some idea what it sounded like... sublime.
Don't know if he has ever recorded it though.

In the more contemporary (non-trad/folk) realm, there's a very nice
brooding version of Oscar Wilde's "Ballad of Reading Gaol" done by
ex-Virgin Prune frontman, Gavin Friday, (it's actually an extract and
he renames it "Each Man Kills the Thing he Loves").

If I remember any others I'll let you know.... I have to run, I just
got done riding and I'm dying with the hunger.
peter et nathalie Joos-Laeng
2004-02-13 06:25:00 UTC
Leonard Cohen: Take this Waltz is a poemFrederico Garcia Lorca, 'translated'
in english. The poem is called:Little Viennese Waltz
Trish
2004-02-13 07:08:20 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Cherie Camp sings versions of a couple of Emily Dickinson's poems ("Hello,
I'm Nobody" and "A Certain Slant of Light") in the Patricia Rozema film
"White Room".
--
Trish
Dublin, Ireland
PrivateCitizen_dudley
2004-02-13 08:26:00 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Not so modern, nor a group, but Phil Ochs set Alfred Noyes' "The
Highwayman" to music.

The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees,
The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,
And the highwayman came riding--
Riding--riding--
The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.

Yrs,
Robert dudley Dickinson
Will Dockery
2004-02-13 17:50:56 UTC
You can download a track by Michael McClure & Ray Manzarek, "For Jim
Morrison" at
http://mcclure-manzarek.com/forjimmorrison.html
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Not so modern, nor a group, but Phil Ochs set Alfred Noyes' "The
Highwayman" to music.
The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees,
The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,
And the highwayman came riding--
Riding--riding--
The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.
Yrs,
Robert dudley Dickinson
Séimí mac Liam
2004-02-13 14:30:39 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
The Fugs did Blake's Ah Sunflower,
on the same album was the Swinbourne Stomp and "What a piece of work is
Man".
--
Saint Séimí mac Liam
Carriagemaker to the court of Queen Maeve
Prophet of The Great Tagger
Canonized December '99
PrivateCitizen_dudley
2004-02-14 07:54:15 UTC
Post by Séimí mac Liam
The Fugs did Blake's Ah Sunflower,
on the same album was the Swinbourne Stomp and "What a piece of work is
Man".
Good on ya.

Fugs (Sanders) also recorded Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach". I thnik
originally "Tenderness Junction"; later 1990's "No More Slavery"???

}
Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.
{
Séimí mac Liam
2004-02-14 15:55:54 UTC
Post by PrivateCitizen_dudley
Post by Séimí mac Liam
The Fugs did Blake's Ah Sunflower,
on the same album was the Swinbourne Stomp and "What a piece of work
is Man".
Good on ya.
Fugs (Sanders) also recorded Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach". I thnik
originally "Tenderness Junction"; later 1990's "No More Slavery"???
}
Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.
{
To paraphrase a Phil Ochs album cover, 2 Fugs fans can't be wrong.
--
Saint Séimí mac Liam
Carriagemaker to the court of Queen Maeve
Prophet of The Great Tagger
Canonized December '99
Will Dockery
2004-02-13 15:05:29 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Well, I do have a few of my poems put to music on Mp3:

"Mirror Twins":
http://www.lulu.com/items/29000/29085/preview/Will_Dockery_-_03_-_Track__3.mp3

"God Smiles":
http://www.lulu.com/items/26000/26881/preview/Irony_Waves_-_Track__5.mp3

"Greybeard Cavalier":
http://www.lulu.com/items/26000/26663/preview/Track__1.mp3
Peter J Ross
2004-02-13 23:50:52 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
<spamlinks snipped>

Google the word "hubris", Dorkery.
--
PJR :-)

(Remove NOSPAM to reply)
don freeman
2004-02-13 15:57:15 UTC
Leonard Cohen's Suzanne was originally a poem

Donovan put Shakespear's Under the Greenwood Tree to music

Phil Ochs, aside from the Highwayman, did The Bells by Poe

Bob Marley's War was a poetic speech set to music
mariav
2004-02-13 19:32:19 UTC
Post by don freeman
Leonard Cohen's Suzanne was originally a poem
Donovan put Shakespear's Under the Greenwood Tree to music
Phil Ochs, aside from the Highwayman, did The Bells by Poe
Bob Marley's War was a poetic speech set to music
Yes,Leonard Cohen has had books of poetry books published,a
novel("Beautiful Losers"),like Richard Farina,who released LPs(with
wife Mimi, and "Been Down----",a novelHadju writes of the Dylan-Farina
association in "Positively Fourth Street").All hold well after the
years.Ginsberg put Blake to music,eccentric,even for me(I sent for a
disc "London",and "The Lamb" by Blake(Out of Print,under the name "The
Crackers"),read at a coffeehouse,sold 30 copies of a disc reading
playing Blakesongs,one by Dylan-"Tommorow is a Long Time",put new
music to"God moves in mysterious ways"),Van Morrison recorded the
great one,Yeats,""Your original Face"pn "Too Long in Exile",on "A
Sense of Wonder" recited with a la Spector sound two passages-"The
Price of Experience"&"The Slave Grinding at the Mill"-great,remember
Sebastian Cabot did a recitation? to music(a novelty for him or
us.Who's next,Ray Stevens?).Judy Collins did a few things(I don't like
her,she'll live),a band whose name I can't recall did a
vicious,ominous Blake song,"The Tyger",McClure played something with
his poetry ,didn't he(Bob Dylan told him that was the way,put the
poems to music,Bob's done ok.mv
Fat Nancy
2004-02-13 19:41:21 UTC
Greg Brown's album "Songs of Innocence and Experience" is wonderful.
As you may have guessed, the songs are Blake's poems set to music.
Mcnois
2004-02-13 19:40:01 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
On "Fragments of a Rainy Season," John Cale adapts three Dylan Thomas
poems to music:

"On A Wedding Anniversary"
"Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed"
"Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"
Martin killeen
2004-02-14 03:30:13 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
The Innocence Mission adapt their 'No Storms Come' from the poem
'Heaven-Haven' by Gerard Manley Hopkins: a beautiful performance from
Karen Peris accompanied only by the piano of husband Don.

Martin
Colin Ward
2004-02-14 04:16:23 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
If you have not heard Lord Alfred Tennyson's
"Our Lady of Shallott" on Loreena McKennitt's
"The Visit" CD you just haven't lived. And that
isn't even the best song on the album.

http://www.shop-fast-easy-music.com/cds-item_id-B000002LT2-search_type-AsinSearch-locale-us.html
Tim Baxter
2004-02-15 11:44:08 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Tom Waits set a famous recording of Allen Ginsberg's 'America' to music.
It's really nothing more background music though. It's still Ginsberg
reading it.

Tim
mariav
2004-02-15 21:52:19 UTC
Some poets want some restrriction as to what is done with their work.I
met Philip Glass and we talked briefly,me asking ,that,if you're
putting music to words,how did he choose Ginsberg who is not in my
opinion one of the "great" American poets over
Stafford,Olds,Plath,Bly,Dickey...he mumbled something,to the effect,if
I understood him,that he wanted someone who was beter known,no
quarrel,it takes do re me.On this subject,musicians should honor a
poet's expressed intention in a will,W.B. Yeats,preferring only
classical music for a setting(he died before hip-hop).Van Morrison put
Blake out on "A Sense Of Wonder" with "The Price of
Experience".Kristofferson had on the back of an LP a section of "The
Marriage of Heaven and Hell." You know Carl Sandburg sang many of his
poems,the first hearing reminded me of a mature,wise man like Bob
Dylan. mv at the old folks home,no,it's college
mariav
2004-02-16 20:26:42 UTC
Post by Tim Baxter
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
Tom Waits set a famous recording of Allen Ginsberg's 'America' to music.
It's really nothing more background music though. It's still Ginsberg
reading it.
Tim
A group in this fertile-oh,my goodness-region recorded "The
Tyger"(Blake)and "Crazy Jane on God"(Yeats)on a 1988 recordimg,".The
Crackers.I am not certain they exist ,since they do put a group
picture on the cover(they could be old,they sound old).In fact they
may be an invention of T Bone Burnett.The Yeats is better than
Morrison's Yeats on "Too Long in Exile"("Your Original Face").mv
Féachadóir
2004-02-15 13:18:43 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Much old Irish poetry was in the form of song to begin with. Eibhlín a
Rún for instance has always been known to me as a song, and only
recently did I learn it had been "upgraded" to a poem.

The distinction between song and poem is artificial. There are modern
songs that stand as poetry. Most of Bruce Springsteen for instance.
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".


Eibhlín a Rún
Cearbhaill Ó Dalaigh

Le grá dhuit níl radharc am cheann,
Eibhlín a Riún,
Is trácht ort is saidhbhreas liom,
Eibhlín a Riún;
Ó mo mhórdháil ró-ghreidhnmhear thú,
sólás na Soillse's tú,
Ó mo lile thú, mo mheidhir is tú,
mo bhruinneal thú go deimhin.
A's mo chlús dá bhfuil sa choill seo's tú.
As mo chroí 'stigh níl leigheas gan tú,
Eibhlín a Riún.

Le cúirtéis na tlúig bhéit, is tú,
Eibhlín a Riún,
Dúrt bréag nú's liam fhéinig tú,
Eibhlín a Riún,
Mar is breátha ná Bhénus tú,
'sis áilne ná'n Réilthean tú;
Ó mo Hélen tú gan bhéim is tú mo rós,
mo lil mo chraobh
Mo stór d'á bhfuil sa tsaol so's tú,
Agus rún mo chroí agus mo chléibh is tú,
Eibhlín a Riún.

Do shiúlfainn féin i gcónáí leat,
Eibhlín a Rún :|
Do shiúlfainn féin i gcónáí leat,
síos go Tír Amhlghaidh leat,
Mar shúil go mbéinn i gcleamhnas,
Eibhlín a Rún.

An dtiocfaidh no'n bhanfaidh tó,
Eibhlín a Rún :|
Tiocfaidh mé, 'sní fhanfaidh mé,
Tiocfaidh mé,' sní fhanfaidh mé
Tiocfaidh mé, 'sní fhanfaidh mé
'S éalóidh mé stór.

Sheolfainn féin gamhna leat,
Eibhlín a Rún :|
Sheolfainn féin gamhna leat,
síos go Tír Amhlghaidh leat
Mar shúil go mbeinn i gcleamhnas leat,
Eibhlín a Rún.

An dtiocfaidh tú nó an bhfanfaidh tú,
Eibhlín a Rún? :|
Tiocfaidh mé is ní fhanfaidh mé,
tiocfaidh mé is ni fhanfaidh mé
Tiocfaidh mé is ní fhanfaidh mé
is ealóidh mé le me stór.
--
"Ferr fíor fertaib"
Féachadóir
don freeman
2004-02-15 18:07:03 UTC
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
Féachadóir
2004-02-16 10:50:33 UTC
Post by don freeman
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she
He...
Post by don freeman
pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
He left it to the class to discuss. The students picked the song and
its possible meanings apart for themselves.
--
"Ferr fíor fertaib"
Féachadóir
Dennis M. Hammes
2004-02-17 13:05:43 UTC
Post by don freeman
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
Perhaps she didn't know that Eleanor was the wife for whom Rigby
designed the .416 Rigby cartridge, so that a woman could take
"thick-skinned, dangerous" game in Africa legally (min. .40 bore)
and without getting knocked over the horizon from the recoil. Usual
at the time were the .577 or .600 Nitro Express in the Rigby or
other double rifle, recoil from which is more energy than a .38
Special delivers with the bullet.
(The .416 Rigby was reintroduced by Remington in the 700 long
magnum action a couple decades ago.)
--
-------(m+
~/:o)_|
The sucking noises made by Babies is not law,
no matter how many of them *agree* that it is.
http://scrawlmark.org
Will Dockery
2004-02-17 18:14:43 UTC
Post by Dennis M. Hammes
Post by don freeman
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
Perhaps she didn't know that Eleanor was the wife for whom Rigby
designed the .416 Rigby cartridge, so that a woman could take
"thick-skinned, dangerous" game in Africa legally (min. .40 bore)
and without getting knocked over the horizon from the recoil. Usual
at the time were the .577 or .600 Nitro Express in the Rigby or
other double rifle, recoil from which is more energy than a .38
Special delivers with the bullet.
(The .416 Rigby was reintroduced by Remington in the 700 long
magnum action a couple decades ago.)
A couple decades--- "Eleanor Rigby" is closer to four decades.
Will

http://music.lulu.com/content/29085
Post by Dennis M. Hammes
-------(m+
~/:o)_|
The sucking noises made by Babies is not law,
no matter how many of them *agree* that it is.
http://scrawlmark.org
Dennis M. Hammes
2004-02-18 15:22:48 UTC
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Dennis M. Hammes
Post by don freeman
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
Perhaps she didn't know that Eleanor was the wife for whom Rigby
designed the .416 Rigby cartridge, so that a woman could take
"thick-skinned, dangerous" game in Africa legally (min. .40 bore)
and without getting knocked over the horizon from the recoil. Usual
at the time were the .577 or .600 Nitro Express in the Rigby or
other double rifle, recoil from which is more energy than a .38
Special delivers with the bullet.
(The .416 Rigby was reintroduced by Remington in the 700 long
magnum action a couple decades ago.)
A couple decades--- "Eleanor Rigby" is closer to four decades.
Will
Illiterate.
The riflemaker John Rigby designed the .416 for his wife because
she wanted to accompany him on safari. Her field tests caused its
commercial release in 1911.
The song is about her.
--
-------(m+
~/:o)_|
The sucking noises made by Babies is not law,
no matter how many of them *agree* that it is.
http://scrawlmark.org
Will Dockery
2004-02-18 15:50:52 UTC
Post by Dennis M. Hammes
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Dennis M. Hammes
Post by don freeman
Post by Féachadóir
In school my English teacher once took a day off from the syllabus to
talk about the Beatles "She's Leaving Home".
I hope she pointed out that the irony in "She's Leaving Home" was much
less subtle and more heavy-handed than in "Eleanor Rigby," a much more
poetic song.
Perhaps she didn't know that Eleanor was the wife for whom Rigby
designed the .416 Rigby cartridge, so that a woman could take
"thick-skinned, dangerous" game in Africa legally (min. .40 bore)
and without getting knocked over the horizon from the recoil. Usual
at the time were the .577 or .600 Nitro Express in the Rigby or
other double rifle, recoil from which is more energy than a .38
Special delivers with the bullet.
(The .416 Rigby was reintroduced by Remington in the 700 long
magnum action a couple decades ago.)
A couple decades--- "Eleanor Rigby" is closer to four decades.
Will
Illiterate.
The riflemaker John Rigby designed the .416 for his wife because
she wanted to accompany him on safari. Her field tests caused its
commercial release in 1911.
The song is about her.
Babytalking fuckwit. The song has nothing to do with her.
Will
Bóliath
2004-02-18 15:22:01 UTC
x-posts snipped
Post by Féachadóir
Much old Irish poetry was in the form of song to begin with. Eibhlín a
Rún for instance has always been known to me as a song, and only
recently did I learn it had been "upgraded" to a poem.
I didn't know it was a poem either.
Post by Féachadóir
Eibhlín a Rún
Cearbhaill Ó Dalaigh
Le grá dhuit níl radharc am cheann,
snipped

stuck in my head all day now ye bastard, you'll have to sing it at the
next sci-con as punishment
Féachadóir
2004-02-18 15:34:43 UTC
Post by Bóliath
x-posts snipped
Post by Féachadóir
Much old Irish poetry was in the form of song to begin with. Eibhlín a
Rún for instance has always been known to me as a song, and only
recently did I learn it had been "upgraded" to a poem.
I didn't know it was a poem either.
Post by Féachadóir
Eibhlín a Rún
Cearbhaill Ó Dalaigh
Le grá dhuit níl radharc am cheann,
snipped
stuck in my head all day now ye bastard, you'll have to sing it at the
next sci-con as punishment
Better, lets organise a SCI CON in the Rusty Mackerel (see
ProperIrishPubs for details) and you can listen to Kitty Sean sing it.
--
"Ferr fíor fertaib"
Féachadóir
Bóliath
2004-02-19 18:00:23 UTC
Post by Féachadóir
Post by Bóliath
stuck in my head all day now ye bastard, you'll have to sing it at the
next sci-con as punishment
Better, lets organise a SCI CON in the Rusty Mackerel (see
ProperIrishPubs for details) and you can listen to Kitty Sean sing it.
"located halfway up Sliabh Liag, the highest sea cliff in Europe, a
perfect place for a refreshing pint or three after a hike across the
mountain goddess"

You think you could get sci people to hike halfway up a mountain?

Are we all staying in your house? Nice one! I don't like black pudding
with my fry and wheat toast please.

BlackMonk
2004-02-16 00:04:25 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
First that comes to mind is Syd Barrett's recording of James Joyce's "Golden
Hair."
mariav
2004-02-16 20:33:12 UTC
Post by BlackMonk
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
First that comes to mind is Syd Barrett's recording of James Joyce's "Golden
Hair."
I'll plead guilty to not reading every line of evry entry,but has
anyone mentioned Eliot's "Cats".mv
westprog
2004-02-16 20:35:24 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Billy Bragg - A Pict Song, Kipling.


C/

SOTW: "Mr Psycho" - Space

"So, you don't care about the Irish in the 6 counties ?"

"It is because I care so much about them that I get very annoyed when wannabee
plastic paddies who live 3000 miles away pay good money to have some of
them shot
when they answer the door at night." - Des
Dennis M. Hammes
2004-02-17 13:06:48 UTC
Post by mariav
Post by BlackMonk
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
First that comes to mind is Syd Barrett's recording of James Joyce's "Golden
Hair."
I'll plead guilty to not reading every line of evry entry,but has
anyone mentioned Eliot's "Cats".mv
No. Heh. Possibly we were trying to forget it.
--
-------(m+
~/:o)_|
The sucking noises made by Babies is not law,
no matter how many of them *agree* that it is.
http://scrawlmark.org
westprog
2004-02-17 19:54:32 UTC
Post by Mcnois
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
On "Fragments of a Rainy Season," John Cale adapts three Dylan Thomas
"On A Wedding Anniversary"
"Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed"
"Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"
That's a live performance of The Falkland Suite, from Words For The Dying,

which consists of six tracks of Dylan Thomas.

He also did A Child's Christmas In Wales on Paris 1919, though I think that

was more inspired by.

Also his colleague Lou Reed did a complete album based on the works and life

of Poe, called The Raven IIRCBIMBW.

C/

SOTW: "Mr Psycho" - Space

"So, you don't care about the Irish in the 6 counties ?"

"It is because I care so much about them that I get very annoyed when wannabee

plastic paddies who live 3000 miles away pay good money to have some of
them shot
when they answer the door at night." - Des
westprog
2004-02-18 12:42:52 UTC
Post by Mcnois
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
Thanks,
Jan Dullemond
On "Fragments of a Rainy Season," John Cale adapts three Dylan Thomas
"On A Wedding Anniversary"
"Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed"
"Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"
That's a live performance of The Falkland Suite, from Words For The Dying,
which consists of six tracks of Dylan Thomas.

He also did A Child's Christmas In Wales on Paris 1919, though I think that
was more inspired by.

Also his colleague Lou Reed did a complete album based on the works and life
of Poe, called The Raven IIRCBIMBW.

C/

SOTW: "Mr Psycho" - Space
beppe
2004-02-19 01:22:55 UTC
Post by Ouverture
I'm a student teacher and I'm making a web quest about poems that are
set to music all through the ages, from traditional ballads and
Shakespeare songs to poems set to rap, rock, grunge and punk.
Can anyone give me suggestions about modern groups which have used
English, American or Irish poems?
FWIW,
I recorded a version of *Burn Baby Burn* in '99.
It's to be found on *Biblica Boulevard*, though a little hard to find......
:-)))
Neither a famous group nor a great rendition (I'm afraid) but sure a
*modern* one!
:-)))
--
ciao

beppe

www.giuseppegazerro.com
www.dylanmeeting.com